Tag Archives: Trash
Quote 18 Feb

“The artist’s home and studio were stacked with his artworks, cast-off items, including three broken refrigerators with the doors still attached. A separate storage room was piled to the ceiling with jumbled junk, more artworks, damaged electrical cords and worn-out clothing.” More

Fresh Kill by Gordon Matta-Clark, 1972

16 Apr

The Fresh Kills Landfill was a landfill covering 2,200 acres (890 ha) in the New York City borough of Staten Island in the United States. The landfill was opened in 1947 as a temporary landfill, but eventually became New York City’s principal landfill in the second half of the 20th century, and it was once the largest landfill, as well as man-made structure, in the world. In October 2009, reclamation of the site began on a multi-phase, 30-year site development for reuse as Freshkills Park.

Field trip (chapter 3)

2 May

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Thomas Hirschhorn, Laundrette, 2001 / HVCCA

2 May

What is a freegan?

28 Apr

Freegans are people who employ alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources. Freegans embrace community, generosity, social concern, freedom, cooperation, and sharing in opposition to a society based on materialism, moral apathy, competition, conformity, and greed.

We live in an economic system where sellers only value land and commodities relative to their capacity to generate profit (…) As freegans we forage instead of buying to avoid being wasteful consumers ourselves, to politically challenge the injustice of allowing vital resources to be wasted while multitudes lack basic necessities like food, clothing, and shelter, and to reduce the waste going to landfills and incinerators which are disproportionately situated within poor, non-white neighborhoods, where they cause elevated levels of cancer and asthma.

 Perhaps the most notorious freegan strategy is what is commonly called “urban foraging” or “dumpster diving”. This technique involves rummaging through the garbage of retailers, residences, offices, and other facilities for useful goods. Despite our society’s sterotypes about garbage, the goods recovered by freegans are safe, useable, clean, and in perfect or near-perfect condition, a symptom of a throwaway culture that encourages us to constantly replace our older goods with newer ones, and where retailers plan high-volume product disposal as part of their economic model. Some urban foragers go at it alone, others dive in groups, but we always share the discoveries openly with one another and with anyone along the way who wants them. Groups like Food Not Bombs recover foods that would otherwise go to waste and use them to prepare meals to share in public places with anyone who wishes to partake.

http://freegan.info/

http://www.foodnotbombs.net/

The Bough That Falls with All its Trophies Hung, 2009 / by Bryan Zanisnik

28 Apr

Bryan Zanisnik

28 Apr