Tag Archives: Food

Cooking bookstore

16 Apr

Nach Waxman is the alpha and omega of the recorded history of food. The owner of New York’s Kitchen Arts & Letters bookstore has a near boundless knowledge of cookbooks, recipes, and the evolution of attitudes towards food. For Chow, he gives an interview in which he lays out all the dirty secrets: why cooking from a recipe is just paint-by-numbers, which of the big-name chefs actually do their own book shopping, and the real trick by which an independent bookstore can beat the pants off of Barnes & Noble.

Nach Waxman of Kitchen Arts & Letters


What is a freegan?

28 Apr

Freegans are people who employ alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources. Freegans embrace community, generosity, social concern, freedom, cooperation, and sharing in opposition to a society based on materialism, moral apathy, competition, conformity, and greed.

We live in an economic system where sellers only value land and commodities relative to their capacity to generate profit (…) As freegans we forage instead of buying to avoid being wasteful consumers ourselves, to politically challenge the injustice of allowing vital resources to be wasted while multitudes lack basic necessities like food, clothing, and shelter, and to reduce the waste going to landfills and incinerators which are disproportionately situated within poor, non-white neighborhoods, where they cause elevated levels of cancer and asthma.

 Perhaps the most notorious freegan strategy is what is commonly called “urban foraging” or “dumpster diving”. This technique involves rummaging through the garbage of retailers, residences, offices, and other facilities for useful goods. Despite our society’s sterotypes about garbage, the goods recovered by freegans are safe, useable, clean, and in perfect or near-perfect condition, a symptom of a throwaway culture that encourages us to constantly replace our older goods with newer ones, and where retailers plan high-volume product disposal as part of their economic model. Some urban foragers go at it alone, others dive in groups, but we always share the discoveries openly with one another and with anyone along the way who wants them. Groups like Food Not Bombs recover foods that would otherwise go to waste and use them to prepare meals to share in public places with anyone who wishes to partake.

http://freegan.info/

http://www.foodnotbombs.net/