Archive | April, 2012

Fresh Kill by Gordon Matta-Clark, 1972

16 Apr

The Fresh Kills Landfill was a landfill covering 2,200 acres (890 ha) in the New York City borough of Staten Island in the United States. The landfill was opened in 1947 as a temporary landfill, but eventually became New York City’s principal landfill in the second half of the 20th century, and it was once the largest landfill, as well as man-made structure, in the world. In October 2009, reclamation of the site began on a multi-phase, 30-year site development for reuse as Freshkills Park.

Starving Artists’ Cookbook

16 Apr

Soup by John Cage

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Cooking bookstore

16 Apr

Nach Waxman is the alpha and omega of the recorded history of food. The owner of New York’s Kitchen Arts & Letters bookstore has a near boundless knowledge of cookbooks, recipes, and the evolution of attitudes towards food. For Chow, he gives an interview in which he lays out all the dirty secrets: why cooking from a recipe is just paint-by-numbers, which of the big-name chefs actually do their own book shopping, and the real trick by which an independent bookstore can beat the pants off of Barnes & Noble.

Nach Waxman of Kitchen Arts & Letters


The collection of Seth Siegelaub

3 Apr

Metropilos M / nr 1 2012/ An Interview with Seth Siegelaub

Seth Siegelaub is known for his revolutionary attitude in showing and promoting Conceptual Art in the sixties and seventies. His gallery, Seth Siegelaub Contemporary Art, which he opened after having worked at Sculpture Center in NY (‘yes, the same institution with the same name today, but then a far more conservative “garden sculpture” set-up’), was only operational from 1964 to 1966. After closing the gallery, (‘it was a boring experience, but probably necessary for my growing up’) he worked as an independent curator – or whatever it was called back then – organizing shows, projects and working closely with artists such as Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth and Lawrence Weiner. For some time now, he has been living in Amsterdam. There, he heads up the Stichting Egress Foundation, in which his passions for contemporary art, textile and critical theory converge.

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Coptic tunic (detail) Egypt, ca. 6th century, wool and linen, CSROT Historic Textile Collection at the Stichting Egress Foundation, Amsterdam

Raven Row Gallery, The Stuff That Matters. Textiles collected by Seth Siegelaub for the CSROT

The first exhibition of the collection of historic textiles assembled by Seth Siegelaub over the past thirty years for the Center for Social Research on Old Textiles (CSROT). The exhibition will feature over 200 items from a collection currently comprising around 650. It will include woven and printed textiles, embroideries and costume, ranging from fifth-century Coptic to Pre-Columbian Peruvian textiles, late medieval Asian and Islamic textiles, and Renaissance to eighteenth-century European silks and velvets. Barkcloth (tapa) and headdresses from the Pacific region (especially Papua New Guinea) and Africa will also be on display.

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