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Museum as an Art Practise

3 Nov

Seminar: The Museum as an Art Practice

16 November 2012, Krakow, Poland, 2pm – 7pm
National Museum in Krakow
The Main Building, no. 1, 3 Maja Avenue – Audiovisual Room
Organised by: Cricoteka and the National Museum in Krakow

Actors: Agency, The Archive of Tadeusz Kantor – Cricoteka, MoAA (Museum of American Art), MOLAF (Museum of Longing and Failure) and Antje Majewski & Alejandro Jodorowsky (screening).

The seminar aims to map out Kantor’s vision of a museum, as well as any reflections and actions in any way related to the exhibiting and collecting practices, in the context of the new mission of Cricoteka as an institution where the spectator, the artist, the creative process and the very work of art all become part of activities which straddle theatre, archive and museum. The tool used to achieve this goal will be a conceptual drawing derived from the intersection of different working methodologies within a museum treated as art practice, rather than merely as a space used to archive, secure or negotiate the shape of the canon within art history.

 (curators: Ewa Tatar and Joanna Zielińska)

The Hand that Gives. A conversation between Alejandro Jodorowsky and Antje Majewski, Paris 2010

Join us in in Krakow

See previous posts: AgencyLewis & TaggartMoAA

Hospital For Broken Things

26 Oct

‘Located in Brooklin, New York.  The Hospital For Broken Things is a fictional shop created by American writer Paul Auster. Dedicated to the restoreation of obsolete devises fro, times past, such as typewriters, record players, radios and rotary telephones. The shop is owned and operated by Bing Nathan. A character in Auster’s 2010 novel Sunset Park.’

Inspired by Lewis & Taggart

Marcel Duchamp’s studio

3 Jul

Henri Pierre Roché, Marcel Duchamp’s Studio, c. 1916-18. Courtesy Jean-Jacques Lebel.

Elena Filipovic / A Museum That is Not

One could say that everything begins and ends in Marcel Duchamp’s studio. His first New York studio is perhaps best known from a series of small and grainy photos, some of them out of focus. They were taken sometime between 1916 and 1918 by a certain Henri-Pierre Roché, a good friend of Duchamp. Roché was a writer, not a professional photographer, clearly. He was the same guy who would go on to write Jules et Jim, arguably a far better novel than these are photographs. But their aesthetic quality was not really what mattered. Duchamp was attached to those little pictures. He kept them and went back to them years later, working on them and then leaving them out for us like his laundry in the picture. Or like clues in a detective novel.

There isn’t a single photograph among them that shows his studio (which was also his home, in this case) cleaned up. Duchamp’s drawers are open, his shoes and pillows are strewn across the floor, dust has collected in the corners. The supposed cold conceptualist, the guy who epilated his entire body because he seemed not to like the unkemptness of body hair (and requested that his partner at the time consider doing the same), the artist of the industrially produced readymades—lives in a pigsty.1 This is not the first nor will it be the last of many Duchampian paradoxes. Still, Duchamp’s sense of housekeeping and the dust that he bred in his apartment is not so much my point as is his arrangement of objects. While he might live with a mess, everything also has its place. The small photographs reveal that the shiny porcelain urinal on view is not in the bathroom (although there might be another one there), or even tucked in a corner—it’s hung over a doorway. The disorder of the room might appear careless, except that a urinal simply doesn’t get up there by accident. Duchamp’s snow shovel is not casually leaning against a wall waiting for use—it is suspended from the ceiling. And his coatrack lies inconveniently and ridiculously in the middle of the room, nailed to the floor. Selected objects in chosen positions.

 Remember, this is sometime around 1917, several years after the artist first started to bring everyday objects into his studio. Back then, he had a Paris atelier, which his sister cleaned up when the artist moved to New York, throwing the first readymades into a dustbin, where she innocently thought they belonged…

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Vivienne Westwood & Keith Haring

12 Jun

Witches (1983-84)

Vivienne Westwood visited New York. She met Keith Haring. His art looked like magic signs and hieroglyphs. Therefore – collection ‘Witches’. Hip hop, styling of garments stop-frame look, white trainers customized with three tongues, pointed Chico Marx hats.

See previous post about Keith Haring

Keith Haring

29 May

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American Museum of Natural History

22 May

High school students in Fossil Mammal Hall of the American Museum of Natural History, New York City, 1900

Source: New York State Education Department, Division of Visual Instruction

Interior view of the first floor of the Bird Hall at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Rows of display cases feature birds in this long room. Above, the central part of the ceiling is removed,1895-1910?

Source: New York State Archives. Education Dept. Division of Visual Instruction

View of displays in the Ethnological Hall at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Masks, statues and other artifacts are displayed inside and on top of display cases. A Haida canoe hangs from the ceiling, 1895-1910?

Source: New York State Archives. Education Dept. Division of Visual Instruction

The McKittrick Hotel

21 May

Sleep No More takes place at the fictional McKittrick Hotel, a reference to the film Vertigo. The hotel was completed in 1939 and “intended to be New York City’s finest and most decadent luxury hotel”. Six weeks before opening, and two days after the outbreak of World War II, the legendary hotel was condemned and left locked, permanently sealed from the public until it was restored and reinvented by Punchdrunk and Emursive. The McKittrick Hotel is actually three adjoining warehouses in Chelsea’s gallery district at 530, West 27th Street. The address is the former home of megaclubs Twilo, Spirit, Guesthouse, Home, Bed and more. The 100,000-square-foot (9,300 m2) space has been transformed by Punchdrunk into “some 100 rooms and environments, including a spooky hospital, mossy garden and bloody bedroom.”

" href="//vimeo.com/26201565]" target="_blank">Inside the Hotel

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